The laws governing wages and hours of work affect nearly everyone. How employees are paid, whether as hourly non-exempt, salaried-exempt, tipped, or commissioned sales workers, and how much they are paid, are questions of deep interest to employees and employers alike. And because the laws regulating wages generally apply only to employees, as opposed to independent contractors, who qualifies as an employee is also a significant issue of concern.

All these issues were addressed in 2020 by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeal, and state legislatures. Federal and state laws regulating wages and hours of work continued to change and develop last year, expanding in some areas and contracting in others.

In “2020 Wage & Hour Developments: A Year in Review,” attorneys in Jackson Lewis’ Wage and Hour Practice Group look back on the past year’s significant wage and hour developments  in the laws governing the payment of wages and limitations on hours of work.

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of David T. Wiley David T. Wiley

David T. Wiley is the Knowledge Management (“KM”) Attorney for Jackson Lewis P.C.’s Wage and Hour Practice Group, and is based in the Birmingham, Alabama, office.

Mr. Wiley creates and manages legal and electronic resources and materials to provide innovative client services; serves…

David T. Wiley is the Knowledge Management (“KM”) Attorney for Jackson Lewis P.C.’s Wage and Hour Practice Group, and is based in the Birmingham, Alabama, office.

Mr. Wiley creates and manages legal and electronic resources and materials to provide innovative client services; serves as a resource for other practice group members; monitors and analyzes regulatory and case law developments; and contributes to the firm’s blogs and legal updates. In his knowledge management role, Mr. Wiley draws on more than two decades of training, advising, and representing employers nationwide in federal and state courts and before administrative agencies on a variety of employment-related issues, including collective and class actions and all manner of discrimination and retaliation claims.

Prior to obtaining his MBA and law degrees, Mr. Wiley served six distinguished years as an officer in the United States Navy Supply Corps. While attending law school, Mr. Wiley was the Senior Articles Editor for the Georgia Law Review.