On November 30, 2015, New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio signed a bill establishing an “Office of Labor Standards,” to be headed by a Director appointed by the Mayor. The Office, once established, is tasked with “study[ing] and mak[ing] recommendations for worker education, safety and protection, educat[ing] employers on labor laws, creat[ing] public education

Courts adjudicating employment disputes under employment statutes will decline to do so where inquiry into the employment relationship will interfere with First Amendment religious protections. Often, this concerns a claim challenging the legality of termination of a member of the clergy, but the concept can also extend to such employees’ claims under wage-and-hour laws, as

Trenton, New Jersey, like numerous other municipalities (especially in New Jersey), recently enacted its own paid sick leave law. As with Seattle’s recent minimum wage rulemaking, a coalition of New Jersey business groups challenged the city’s authority to do so, urging that the ordinance exceeded the city’s police powers and offended constitutional protections. New

On February 12, Mayor Michael Nutter signed a bill requiring Philadelphia employers with 10 or more employees to offer paid sick leave, joining neighbors New York City and Newark, New Jersey, as well as other states and localities, in enacting such a requirement.  The Philadelphia bill takes effect in mid-May, and requires that eligible

With Election Day approaching (November 3, 2009), employers are reminded to review their policies and practices regarding the provision of time off to vote.  Most states require employers to allow employees time to vote during the workday and, in some cases, to inform employees of their right to time off.  Sharing information with employees about