Tag Archives: california labor code

Uber Litigation Continues To Serve As Legal Lightning Rod for “On Demand” Economy

Cases challenging the independent contractor status of certain service providers under the wage-and-hour laws are likely to continue in the near future due to the difficulties in applying the law to complex factual patterns. The Department of Labor recently provided additional guidance for determining contractor status in the form of an Administrator’s Interpretation (and the … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Finds That Insurance Claims Adjusters Are Exempt Administrative Employees Under California Law

Applying California’s administrative exemption test, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently concluded an insurance company properly classified its claims adjusters (who handled and processed disability claims) as exempt from the overtime provisions of the California Labor Code, notwithstanding the clerical duties the adjusters performed and their characterization of their work as … Continue Reading

Interpreting Oracle, California Court Limits Application Of State Wage Laws Vis a Vis Out of State Employees

The California Supreme Court’s 2012 decision in Sullivan v. Oracle signaled, but did not conclusively rule, that no circumstances could support a California Labor Code claim by an employee working outside the State of California.  However, a new California federal court decision emphatically holds that the application of California’s Labor Code should end at the … Continue Reading

California Court Upholds Employer’s Classification of Registered Dietitians as Exempt ”Professionals”

As the healthcare field continues to expand to meet evolving standards of care and government regulations, industry employers have created or modified categories of professional employees to meet business and medical needs.  New positions have been created which are not addressed by name in existing DOL regulations and case law concerning applicability of the learned … Continue Reading

California Supreme Court Rules Plaintiffs’ Attorney Cannot Recover Fees Under Labor Code Fee Shifting Provision in California Meal and Rest Lawsuits

California’s Supreme Court has again spoken on meal and rest period litigation, this time holding neither employers nor employees may recover their attorney’s fees in cases requiring employers to provide meal breaks and rest breaks. In the wake of its highly publicized Brinker Restaurant Corporation decision, where the Supreme Court ruled California law requires employers to … Continue Reading

Sullivan v. Oracle Confirmed As California Law by Ninth Circuit

In August, we discussed the California Supreme Court’s ruling addressing the circumstances under which a non-California resident can be covered by that state’s employee-friendly Labor Code.  Sullivan v. Oracle Corp., 51 Cal. 4th 1191 (2011).  Yesterday, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit adopted the state court’s ruling, rejecting Defendant’s constitutional challenges to that … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit: California Wage Claims Do Not Usurp Public Utility Commission’s Jurisdiction

As we recently discussed, interplay between state wage-and-hour laws and other statutes (federal or state) is not always seamless, as neither the state wage statute nor the competing law or regulation at issue properly addresses the extent to which their scope might interfere with each other. However, as employment statutes, the wage-and-hour laws are often construed … Continue Reading

California Enacts Written Commission Plan Law

As discussed by our colleagues at the California Workplace Blog, California governor Jerry Brown has signed into law AB 1396, requiring all employers doing business in California to draft written contracts for any agreements with employees that involve commissions as a method of payment for services.  California joins New York in the vanguard of making … Continue Reading

California Legislature Adds New Penalties For “Willful” Misclassification As Independent Contractors

California, like several other states including Massachusetts and New York, has historically been harsh on employers which abuse the independent contractor designation, classifying individuals who are integrated into their business and function as employees as contractors for the purposes of avoiding tax and wage costs. In fact, Federal Express’ now decade-long battle with courts and agencies … Continue Reading

California Appeals Court Rules Law School Graduate Who Was Not Yet Admitted To Bar Was Exempt “Learned Professional”

The FLSA’s learned professional exemption provides an exemption from overtime for employees who have academic credentials in a field of “science or learning customarily acquired prolonged academic instruction” and who utilize this formal educational training in the performance of their job duties. Typical examples include doctors, lawyers, and certified public accountants, and doctors and lawyers need … Continue Reading

California Supreme Court Finds Out of State Employees Who Perform Work in California May Be Covered by California Labor Code

In a long awaited decision, California’s Supreme Court has ruled that the State’s Labor Code provisions governing overtime pay may apply to non-residents working in California for “a California-based employer.” Sullivan v. Oracle Corp., 51 Cal. 4th 1191 (2011). A detailed analysis of the decision and its potential implications is available here. California wage-and-hour practitioners and commentators … Continue Reading

California Federal Court Rejects Plaintiff’s Attempt To Impose Joint Employer Liability On Outside Human Resources Consultant

Wage and hour plaintiffs, like all plaintiffs, seek recovery from the largest, most viable defendants. Often, employees who separate from failing businesses seek to broaden the scope of the concept of “employer” within the meaning of wage-hour laws and include as defendants other potentially-liable parties with “deep pockets.” As discussed here, a federal court in Pennsylvania recently … Continue Reading

California Workplace Blog Coverage of Campbell v. PWC: Unlicensed Accountants Eligible for Professional Exemption

As discussed in detail on Jackson Lewis’ California Workplace Blog, the Ninth Circuit has resuscitated the California Labor Code’s “learned professional” exemption, reversing a decision from the Eastern District of California which held that unlicensed accountants could not qualify as a matter of law.  Campbell v. PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP, 2011 U.S. App. LEXIS 12062 (9th Cir. … Continue Reading

California Appeals Court Issues Pro-Employer Ruling Regarding Wage Statement Compliance

The surge of state wage and hour claims continues in California. Among the numerous California Labor Code provisions which has been the subject of repeated litigation is California Labor Code § 226(a) (“226”), which creates specific requirements concerning the content of employee wage statements. Included among its provisions is a requirement that wage statements indicate the “total … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Decision Highlights Concerns With Independent Contractor Classification

In a decision reiterating important independent contractor issues for employers, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals last week reversed a lower court decision holding that certain delivery drivers were properly classified as independent contractors under various provisions of the California Labor Code. Narayan v. EGL, Inc., 2010 U.S. App. LEXIS 14279 (9th Cir. July 13, 2010). … Continue Reading

California Meal and Rest Period Compliance: Where Are We Now?

As every California employer knows, wage and hour class actions in California are never-ending.  One basis for many of these class actions has been employers’ alleged non-compliance with California meal and rest period requirements.  As to meal periods, the two overriding issues have been whether an employer is required to ensure non-exempt employees take their meal … Continue Reading
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