“Retail or service” is a classic example of a phrase of which the apparent plain language meaning does not bear a strong relationship to its legal or practical meaning for purposes of application of the 7(i) exemption. In determining whether an employee works in an industry properly deemed “retail or service” (and accordingly establishing eligibility for

In August, we discussed the California Supreme Court’s ruling addressing the circumstances under which a non-California resident can be covered by that state’s employee-friendly Labor Code.  Sullivan v. Oracle Corp., 51 Cal. 4th 1191 (2011).  Yesterday, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit adopted the state court’s ruling, rejecting Defendant’s constitutional challenges

While states generally are free to enact wage and hour laws providing greater protections than contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act, sometimes such laws run afoul of federal statutes governing particular industries. In a recent decision exemplifying this type of preemption, a judge in the United States District Court of the Southern District of

As noted by our colleagues at http://www.californiaworkplacelawblog.com/, California’s highest court has scheduled oral argument in the Brinker Restaurant Corporation litigation, addressing the state’s meal and rest requirement, for November 8, 2011.  By rule, the Court must issue its decision within 90 days of oral argument, or, by February 6, 2012.  The decision should provide

California, like several other states including Massachusetts and New York, has historically been harsh on employers which abuse the independent contractor designation, classifying individuals who are integrated into their business and function as employees as contractors for the purposes of avoiding tax and wage costs. In fact, Federal Express’ now decade-long battle with courts and