Reviewing a working arrangement common in the financial services industry, particularly with respect to experienced professionals, Judge Katherine B. Forrest of the Southern District of New York recently upheld the Royal Bank of Canada’s (RBC) treatment of a “consultant” as an independent contractor under the federal and state wage/hour and anti-discrimination laws.  Sellers v.

In a lengthy analysis of the “economic realities” test as applied to cable installers, the Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit reversed Judge Elizabeth A. Kovachevich of the Middle District of Florida’s 2012 decision finding cable installers to be properly classified as independent contractors.  Scantland, et al. v. Jeffry Knight, Inc., et al.

Reviewing a district court decision issued two years ago, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has affirmed a ruling finding John Catsimatidis, the CEO and owner of New York-area grocery chain Gristede’s (and a New York Mayoral Candidate), individually liable for wages under the FLSA based on the “economic realities&rdquo

In a significant victory for employers in the series of hotly contested cases regarding the status of interns, the Hearst Corporation successfully defeated class certification under the New York Labor Law. Xuedan Wang v. Hearst Corp., 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 65869 (S.D.N.Y. May 8, 2013). 

As important to wage/hour practitioners and employers as

The Department of Labor often challenges an employer’s independent contractor classification, even when such classification is a matter of long-standing, industry practice.  Such disagreements can result in DOL audits or even DOL litigation seeking alleged unpaid minimum wage and overtime, as well as private enforcement actions. In a recent victory for employers involving litigation brought

As discussed in this space just last week, there is an ongoing war regarding compensation of interns under the FLSA. In a victory for employers, last week, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit ruled that individuals completing externships relating to their enrollment in MedVance Institute’s Medical Billing and Coding Specialist program

As we have detailed many times, the legal determination as to when an individual providing services is performing work which must be compensated under the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the FLSA is not always simple. This inquiry and related questions were at issue in Rui Xiang Huang v. J&A Entm’t Inc., 2012 U.S.

From time to time, employees offer (or are offered an opportunity) to provide further services to their employer in a “freelance” or "contractor" capacity. However, given the control exercised by the employer in the course of the general employment relationship, these arrangements can result in allegations that the “hybrid” employee/contractor is in fact at all times

Employers who maintain a tip pool are likely aware that, depending on the employer’s state of operation and prevailing law, such a tip pool typically can consist only employees who are both “customarily and regularly” tipped and who are not themselves “employers” or those with employer authority. Last year, we discussed a court’s recognition of the